Outside the Box

by Cheryl Hatch, Copyright 2015

I was sitting in the stands for the Allegheny women’s basketball game against DePauw last Friday night. I sat in my usual spot, across the court from the Gators’ bench. I looked around. Something was off.

I was swimming in a sea of DePauw colors. Men’s players surrounded me. To my  right, a boisterous section of fans in black-and-gold were chanting before the game began.

The DePauw cheering section eclipsed the scant Gators in attendance.

And DePauw is in Indiana.

The women played against a top-notch team while their opponent’s fans screamed and clapped. The Gators took a beating and headed to the locker room as the stands filled for the men’s game.

Men from the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity stood in a row, each with a single letter painted on a bare chest: G-A-T-O-R-S. Throughout the game, the painted FIJIs and other students in the section stomped their feet, shouted organized chants and rallied the crowd and team.

There was more of everything at the men’s game. More fans. More noise. More energy. More support.

At halftime, a women basketball player escorted me to center court. I joined a number of my colleagues who received recognition from a student athlete on the team during Faculty Appreciation Night. I was giddy and proud to accept the certificate of appreciation and the student’s hand-written note tucked into the back of the frame.

The next day, I attended the women’s game against Wittenberg and the men’s against Wabash. There was better attendance for the women’s game; however, the fans at the men’s game packed the stands and rocked the house.

I’ll admit it. I was ticked when I left the Wise Center. Why doesn’t the women’s team get the same level of support as the men’s?

I asked a woman player about the DePauw game. Sure, she noticed the stands with the out-of-town fans.

It’s embarrassing, she said. To be the home team and have more fans for the opposing team.

I was a college athlete. I understand the power of cheering fans.

I rowed crew at Oregon State. Rowing is not exactly a spectator sport. Fans can line the dock or the riverbanks near the finish line. I remember once my boyfriend came to a home regatta. He joined the people shouting encouragement as they leaned over the bridge on the Willamette River.

Those raised voices—and knowing my boyfriend was among them—meant the world to me. When my will was flagging near the finish, the coxswain’s command and the shout of the crowd inspired me, pushed me. The cheers uplifted all of us and helped us move the boat.

Cheers and fans make a difference. And all Allegheny athletes deserve the support.

College athletes put in long hours, in and out of season. The women’s basketball team dedicates six days a week to the sport. Four practices a week for three to four and a half hours. Home games take at least three hours each. Traveling times for away games take anywhere from four to seven hours round-trip. Add time for lifting and training. Reviewing game films. Spending extra time with a coach or practicing shots. They can spend at least 30 hours—or more—each week on the game.

They also put in the time in the classroom and in study to meet the demands of their rigorous academic programs.

Allegheny athletic director Portia Hoeg played college ball at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. As an athlete and administrator, she understands the power of the crowd.

“I think it means everything to an athlete,” she said, of seeing peers and family in the stands. “It gives a boost of confidence and excitement to play your best.”

Hoeg didn’t have an explanation why the fan base is bigger at the men’s games.

I learned rumor has it that some students party during the women’s game and show up spirited for the men’s game.

This Saturday, the men and women’s teams play at home again. I’m on a mission. I want to see the crowds pack the house from both teams.

Men of FIJI, I invite you to show up and cheer for the women as loudly as you cheered for the men last Friday. To the rowdy crowd that chanted for the men on Saturday, bring your energy and enthusiasm early to the court and roar for the women’s team, too.

Like I said, I’m on mission.

The women tip-off against Ohio Wesleyan at 1 p.m.; the men’s start is 3 p.m.

For the women, it’s Senior Day, when they will recognize the players who are finishing their basketball careers at Allegheny.

It’s also Valentine’s Day on Saturday.

Bring a date to the game. For community members, it’s five dollars for an adult. Three dollars if you’re 55 or older. For a non-Allegheny student, it’s two dollars. Free for children six and under. The concession stand offers popcorn and snacks. It’s a bargain and a lot of fun.

Let’s all show the women’s basketball team some love on Valentine’s Day.

Note: this column ran in The Meadville Tribune on Saturday, Feb. 14, 2015.

Cheryl Hatch is a writer, photojournalist and visiting assistant professor of journalism in the public interest at Allegheny College.

###

Advertisements